The neurotransmitter section of the Nutrition Genome Report looks at the GAD1 gene for glutamate. The GAD1 gene is connected to the conversion of excess glutamate to GABA. People who have numerous gene variants in GAD1 have a slower conversion of glutamate to GABA, and therefore may be more susceptible to the neurodegenerative damage from excess glutamate.

The diagram below shows you how women and men can become more susceptible to elevated glutamate levels and what you can do to lower it to help reduce the probability of neurodegenerative disease.

 

 

Sources

  1. Tourette’s Syndrome: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20625961
  2. ADHD and OCD: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4425334/
  3. ALS and Huntington’s Disease: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2842587/
  4. Heart Attack/Stroke: http://www.anaturalcure.com/stroke-heart-failure-blaylock-july-09-2/
  5. Seizures: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7970002
  6. Parkinson’s:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8732541
  7. Alzheimer’s Disease: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3481041/
  8. Estrogen, Progesterone and Glutamate: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20980684
  9. Low Estrogen and Alzheimer’s Disease: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3058507/
  10. Multiple Sclerosis: https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2009/04/4227/glutamate-identified-predictor-disease-
progression-multiple-sclerosis
  11. ADHD: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3966039/
  12. Hypertension. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3628354/
  13. Exercise and glutamate: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23377269
  14. Iron and copper high in air pollution: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3628354/